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New York’s Grand Central in Photos: The Icon Turns 100


Epoch Times Staff
Created: February 1, 2013 Last Updated: February 4, 2013
Related articles: United States » New York City
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The Grand Central Terminal clock’s value is estimated to be between $10 million to $20 million. Its four faces are made of solid opal. It is topped with an acorn, the symbol of the Vanderbilt family. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

The Grand Central Terminal clock’s value is estimated to be between $10 million to $20 million. Its four faces are made of solid opal. It is topped with an acorn, the symbol of the Vanderbilt family. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

NEW YORK—Grand Central turns 100 on Feb. 2. Much more than a transportation hub, this New York City icon draws more than 200,000 visitors a day, making Grand Central the sixth most visited tourist destination in the world.

From the 1960s through to 1990, the terminal was dirty and tired—a haven for homeless people. A major renovation was completed in the early ’90s that cost well over $600 million. It was a revitalization both aesthetically and commercially.

The Grand Central shops now compete with the most successful shopping centers in the United States on a square foot basis, while the restaurants draw an estimated 10,000 people per day just for lunch. This slide show offers some unique insights into the terminal: both its iconic and lesser known places.

Grand Central and the Chrysler Building (top right) on Jan. 31. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

Grand Central and the Chrysler Building (top right) on Jan. 31. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A view of main concourse of the Grand Central Terminal in New York, Jan. 25. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A view of main concourse of the Grand Central Terminal in New York, Jan. 25. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

The constellation ceiling of the terminal features 2,500 stars, 60 of which are illuminated. After completion it was discovered that the constellations are completely backward. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

The constellation ceiling of the terminal features 2,500 stars, 60 of which are illuminated. After completion it was discovered that the constellations are completely backward. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

Grand Central Terminal’s main concourse. More than 700,000 people pass through the terminal daily. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

Grand Central Terminal’s main concourse. More than 700,000 people pass through the terminal daily. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

People exit the train at Grand Central Station in New York on Jan. 18. Grand Central Station refers to the various subways that bring people to the terminal. Grand Central Terminal refers to the main structure; trains terminate there, rather than pass through. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

People exit the train at Grand Central Station in New York on Jan. 18. Grand Central Station refers to the various subways that bring people to the terminal. Grand Central Terminal refers to the main structure; trains terminate there, rather than pass through. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

 

The Oyster Bar at Grand Central Terminal has been serving a huge selection of oysters for 100 years. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

The Oyster Bar at Grand Central Terminal has been serving a huge selection of oysters for 100 years. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

All of the chandeliers in Grand Central Terminal feature exposed light bulbs—Cornelius Vanderbilt’s way of showing New York and the world that the terminal was all electric, a major achievement in 1913. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

All of the chandeliers in Grand Central Terminal feature exposed light bulbs—Cornelius Vanderbilt’s way of showing New York and the world that the terminal was all electric, a major achievement in 1913. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

Grand Central Market at Grand Central Station. The racks above the stalls are made to resemble the baggage storage on MetroNorth trains. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

Grand Central Market at Grand Central Station. The racks above the stalls are made to resemble the baggage storage on MetroNorth trains. (Deborah Yun/The Epoch Times)

A view of the electrical basement of the Grand Central Terminal on Jan. 25. Troops were stationed in the basement throughout World War II to protect the huge electric rotors from sabotage. Adolf Hitler sent spies on submarines in an attempt to destroy them and disable the system. They were caught. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A view of the electrical basement of the Grand Central Terminal on Jan. 25. Troops were stationed in the basement throughout World War II to protect the huge electric rotors from sabotage. Adolf Hitler sent spies on submarines in an attempt to destroy them and disable the system. They were caught. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

Dan Brucker gives a tour to the media on the hidden secrets of the Grand Central Terminal on Jan. 25. The rotary converter behind Brucker is no longer functional. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

Dan Brucker gives a tour to the media on the hidden secrets of the Grand Central Terminal on Jan. 25. The rotary converter behind Brucker is no longer functional. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

An old phone in the basement of the Grand Central Terminal in New York, Jan. 25. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

An old phone in the basement of the Grand Central Terminal in New York, Jan. 25. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A rare view of the Grand Central Terminal’s clock from an open “VI” glass pane on Jan. 25. The clock is the world’s largest example of Tiffany glass. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A rare view of the Grand Central Terminal’s clock from an open “VI” glass pane on Jan. 25. The clock is the world’s largest example of Tiffany glass. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A view of the Grand Central clock from inside the clock tower. The mechanism that runs the clock is set with atomic time from Bethesda, Md. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A view of the Grand Central clock from inside the clock tower. The mechanism that runs the clock is set with atomic time from Bethesda, Md. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

Park Avenue as seen from inside Grand Central’s clock tower. The minute hand can be seen on the right as it passes the open windowpane. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

Park Avenue as seen from inside Grand Central’s clock tower. The minute hand can be seen on the right as it passes the open windowpane. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A view of the face of the Grand Central clock. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A view of the face of the Grand Central clock. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

 

A view of the Grand Central Terminal from the vehicle viaduct on Jan. 31. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

A view of the Grand Central Terminal from the vehicle viaduct on Jan. 31. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

 

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