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Libya Consulate Security ‘Weak,’ Official Says

By Jack Phillips
Epoch Times Staff
Created: October 10, 2012 Last Updated: October 10, 2012
Related articles: United States » National News
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Lt. Col. Andrew Wood testifies on Capitol Hill on Oct. 10, 2012 in Washington, DC. The hearing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee focused on the security situation in Benghazi leading up to the Sept. 11 attack that resulted in the death of U.S. Ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens. (Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)

Lt. Col. Andrew Wood testifies on Capitol Hill on Oct. 10, 2012 in Washington, DC. The hearing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee focused on the security situation in Benghazi leading up to the Sept. 11 attack that resulted in the death of U.S. Ambassador to Libya J. Christopher Stevens. (Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)

The U.S. Special Forces commander who was in charge of a team overseeing security at the American consulate in Libya’s Benghazi said there were not enough people to help protect the facility when militants attacked last month, killing U.S. ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens.

At a House hearing, Lt. Col. Andrew Wood described the security at the consulate as “weak” before the attack took place, which also killed three other Americans, reported The Washington Post.

“The situation remained uncertain and reports from some Libyans indicated it was getting worse,” he said. “The security in Benghazi was a struggle and remained a struggle throughout my time there.”

Under Secretary of State for Management Patrick Kennedy told the Republican-led House Oversight Committee, “We regularly assess risk and resource allocation, a process involving the considered judgments of experienced professionals on the ground and in Washington, using the best available information.”

The attack was “unprecedented” and involved “dozens of heavily armed men,” he continued.

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