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Cooking With a Magnetic Field?

Panasonic’s 2013 appliances draw you into high-tech cooking

By Zoe Ackah
Special Features Editor
Created: November 24, 2012 Last Updated: January 30, 2013
Related articles: Technology » Products
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Panasonic's 2013 kitchen suite, built in inverter microwave, induction cooktop and convection oven. (Panasonic)

Panasonic's 2013 kitchen suite, built in inverter microwave, induction cooktop and convection oven. (Panasonic)

We had a chance to see Panasonic’s new suite of 2013 kitchen appliances, including an induction cooktop, at a recent event featuring Craig Harding, executive chef and owner of Campangnolo restaurant in Toronto.

Panasonic’s inverter technology microwaves have been a kitchen staple, but the company has just begun to produce a full line of cooking appliances in North America.

The microwave, convection oven, and cooktop all match beautifully with the expected sleek glass and chrome finishes and the unexpected matching blue light burners and displays. 

But looks aren’t everything. These appliances have serious gadget-geek appeal.

Fielding your magnetic questions

Chef Craig Harding cooks Pappardelle with chantrelles at Panasonic Cooking Canada's 2013 kitchen suite launch in Toronto. (Zoe Ackah/The Epoch Times)

Chef Craig Harding cooks Pappardelle with chantrelles at Panasonic Cooking Canada's 2013 kitchen suite launch in Toronto. (Zoe Ackah/The Epoch Times)

The jewel in the crown of Panasonic’s new appliances is the induction cooktop. 

“I love this type of cooking,” says Chef Harding. 

If you are a serious cook like Harding, you can think of induction cooking as a type of cooking that offers instant control of heat while being faster and more accurate than gas cooking, with no flame to accidentally extinguish. 

Induction cooking heats the vessel itself directly. In other words, the pot cooks the food.

Induction cooking is also the most energy efficient. What we are used to is heat-transfer cooking, where an electric element or a gas burner transfers heat to pots and pans. Energy is lost in the transfer, not just between the element and the pot, but also into the kitchen air and sometimes onto your fingers. Ouch!

Induction cooking heats the vessel itself directly. In other words, the pot cooks the food. 

Under the cooktop’s smooth glass surface are copper coils. An alternating current passes through the coils, creating a magnetic field that moves current through your pots and pans, heating them up but ignoring the glass cooktop, your fingers, and anything else that has very little iron content. 

If the stovetop gets warm, it is because of heat transfer from the pot. The stovetop cools down a minimum of four times faster than a conventional stove.

Chef Craig Harding lifts his cast iron pan to wipe the stovetop without worry of getting burned. (Zoe Ackah/The Epoch Times)

Chef Craig Harding lifts his cast iron pan to wipe the stovetop without worry of getting burned. (Zoe Ackah/The Epoch Times)

Because the induction stovetop is perfectly flat, it is very easy to clean. And whatever you spill doesn’t get baked onto the stovetop either—it stays cool because it’s not metal, get it? You just wipe it off. 

“When things boil over you wipe it up, and it’s perfect!” exclaimed Harding as he lifted a cast iron pan of scrambled eggs off the stovetop and deftly picked up some strays that had leapt from the pan.

Next, infrared sensors take precise readings of your food inside the pot…………..





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