Subscribe

Edible Flowers

By Jennifer Wickes Created: May 27, 2012 Last Updated: June 6, 2012
Related articles: Life » Food
Print E-mail to a friend Give feedback

Sage flower (Scott Phillips/The Epoch Times)

Sage flower (Scott Phillips/The Epoch Times)

It’s so funny. Some people, including myself, never in a thousand years would even think you could eat a flower. How odd is that? Yet, to others, it has been a part of their life, culture and eating lifestyles for their entire lives.

Do you eat artichokes? How about capers? Flower buds! How about broccoli, cauliflower, broccoflower? Flowers! And the spice saffron? The stamen of yet another flower! See, most of you have been eating flowers and you didn’t even know it.

If any of you watch foreign movies, you will note in the Indian movie Monsoon Wedding that two characters pick marigolds and pop them in their mouths. In the Middle East, India, or Eastern Europe, you may have heard about or even tried rosewater or orange flower water. What about honey? There are liqueurs, herbal mixes, butters, and syrups. The list goes on and on!

Now before you get too excited and start picking flowers and putting them in your soup, there are several things you must consider.

Chive flowers (Scott Phillips/The Epoch Times)

Chive flowers (Scott Phillips/The Epoch Times)

1. NEVER pick flowers that have been exposed to animal excrement. That is a sure way to get sick.

2. NEVER pick flowers that have had insecticides sprayed on them. If it can kill bugs, it can make you sick!

3. If you use fertilizers on your flowers, make sure that the fertilizers are for food consumption.

4. Flowers on the side of the road have been exposed to trash and carbon monoxide. Who wants to eat that?

5. If you are unsure if the flowers are edible, then do not eat them. Why take the risk.

6. Check with your doctor. If you are allergic to dandelions, then eating them will probably make your allergies worse.

7. If the flowers look bruised, or eaten by an insect, don’t eat them. Part of eating flowers is to enjoy the beauty of them.

Lilac blossoms (Scott Phillips/The Epoch Times)

Lilac blossoms (Scott Phillips/The Epoch Times)

8. There are some flowers that are edible and some are poisonous. Before you eat any flower, please make sure to research whether the flower is safe to eat. When in doubt, go without.

Recipes

Floral Liqueur

4 cups vodka or dry white wine
1cup sugar
1–2 cups edible flowers

Gently bruise the flower petals. Place in a jar with the alcohol and allow to steep for a minimum of two days. Add the sugar to the jar and shake. Allow this mixture to steep for a minimum of two weeks. Shake the jar each day twice to make the sugar dissolve. Strain into a clean decanter.

Instant Chartreuse or your own flavored Stoli!

List of Edible Flowers
Angelica
Anise Hyssop
Apple Blossom
Artichoke
Arugula
Bachelor Buttons
Basil
Burnet
Calendula
Carnation
Chamomile
Chicory
Chives
Chrysanthemum
Cilantro/Coriander
Clover
Cornflower/Bachelor Buttons
Dandelion
Daylily
Dill
Elderberry
English Daisy
Fennel
Freesia
Fuchsia
Gardenia
Garlic
Geraniums
Gladiolas
Hibiscus
Hollyhock
Honeysuckle
Hyssop
Iceland Poppy
Impatiens
Jasmine
Lavender
Lemon Verbena
Lilac
Marigold
Marjoram
Mint
Mustard
Nasturtium
Oregano
Okra
Onion
Orange Blossom
Pansy
Passionflower
Pea
Pineapple Sage
Primrose
Red Clover
Redbud
Rose
Rosemary
Rose of Sharon
Safflower
Sage
Savory
Scented Geranium
Snapdragon
Society Garlic
Squash Blossom
Sunflower
Thyme
Tulip
Viola
Violet
Yucca

Flower Butter

1/2 to 1 cup chopped fresh or dried petals
1 pound sweet unsalted butter, room temperature

Finely chop flower petals and mix into softened butter. Allow the mixture to stand at room temperature overnight to allow the flavors to fuse. It is good for a couple of weeks in the refrigerator, or freeze for several months.

Wonderful on breads or used in sugar cookie or pound cake recipes.[/etInfoTable]

Flower Honey

1/2 to 1 cup fresh or dried petals
1 pound honey

Chop petals and add to honey. Using aluminum foil, cover jar and place in a pan of hot water until boiling. Once it reaches boiling, turn the heat off and allow the jar to sit in the water until it cools. Keep the honey in a cool, dark place.

Try in tea and salad dressings, or on croissants, scones, muffins, and bread.[/etInfoTable]

Flower Jelly

Makes 4–5 half pints

2 1/2 cups white wine
1 cup edible flowers
4 cups sugar
1/4 cup lemon juice
3 ounces of liquid pectin
Fresh flower petals

Bring wine to a boil and pour over petals. Cover and allow the flower petals to steep until the mixture is cool. Then, strain the petals out of the wine.

Add the flower infusion to a pot with the sugar and lemon juice. On high heat, bring to a boil until the sugar has dissolved. Then, stir in the pectin. Bring back to a boil, stirring constantly for exactly 1 minute. Take the jelly off the heat and skim off any foam. Allow the jelly to cool slightly; then add more flower petals. Pour into sterilized jars. If petals do not stay suspended, stir jelly as it cools until petals stay in place. Process in hot water bath or seal with paraffin.

Flower Oil

1/2 to 1 cup dried flowers
1 quart vegetable oil

Put flowers and oil into a bottle. Place the bottle in a pan filled with water and simmer water gently for at least 30 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Cover bottle tightly and allow the flavors to infuse for at least a week before using.

Use in salad dressings, marinades, hot pasta, stir-frying.

Flower Syrup

1 cup water
3 cups sugar
1/2 to 1 cup flower petals, whole or crushed

Boil the water, sugar, and flowers for 10 minutes, or until thickened into syrup. Using a cheesecloth, strain into a jar. Keeps up to two weeks in the refrigerator. Can be added to iced tea or poured over pancakes.

Another idea: Try freezing petals in ice cube trays filled with water for a unique addition to your favorite lemonade or iced tea!

Jennifer Wickes is a food writer, recipe developer, and award winning cook. For more of recipes visit: http://jenawix.wordpress.com

The Epoch Times publishes in 35 countries and in 19 languages. Subscribe to our e-newsletter.

 

Tags:


  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000771428758 קסם במגע ספא דגים

    Wow great
    thank u :-)


   

GET THE FREE DAILY E-NEWSLETTER


Selected Topics from The Epoch Times

This is New York