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Chinese Idiom: The Benevolent Has No Enemy

Origin of the idiom 仁者無敵


Epoch Times Staff
Created: January 26, 2013 Last Updated: February 22, 2013
Related articles: China » Culture
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Meng Zi believed that officials who practice benevolent governance will meet with no opposition. He said that the superior man, when looking up, has no reason to feel shame before Heaven, and when looking down, has no reason to feel shame before men. (Satit Srihin/Photos.com)

Meng Zi believed that officials who practice benevolent governance will meet with no opposition. He said that the superior man, when looking up, has no reason to feel shame before Heaven, and when looking down, has no reason to feel shame before men. (Satit Srihin/Photos.com)

“The benevolent has no enemy” (仁者無敵, pronounced rén zhě wú dí) is a Chinese idiom that originated from Meng Zi (孟子), also known as Mencius, the most well-known successor of Confucian doctrine.

Meng Zi advised rulers to administer a benevolent government, be sparing in the use of punishment and fines, and make taxes and levies light.

In this way, the people can properly tend to their fields in order to support their parents and families. They will cultivate their filial piety, respectfulness toward others, and their loyalty and sincerity, serving their elders and superiors.

Such a ruler will meet with no opposition.

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