Subscribe

China’s Leadership Change: The Ongoing Discussion


Epoch Times Staff
Created: November 8, 2012 Last Updated: November 26, 2012
Related articles: China » Regime
Print E-mail to a friend Give feedback

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

9:00 p.m. EST Wednesday — Three Things to Watch for In Announcement of New Leadership

There are three keys things to watch as the new supreme leadership of the Chinese Communist Party and its military is unveiled, beginning in an about an hour (11 a.m. Beijing time, if all goes to plan). All hinge broadly on the political struggle between Hu Jintao and former regime leader Jiang Zemin, and the outcomes of the three possibilities will be telling as to who gained the upper hand in the backroom dealing.

The first is whether Hu Jintao will step down as Chairman of the Central Military Commission (CMC). This idea has been bandied about extensively recently. If Hu does take that plunge, it will be seen as a strong blow to Jiang Zemin and the tradition of Party elders inserting themselves into the operations of the incumbent leadership.

If even Hu removes himself from the picture this time, Jiang will be certifiably unable to exert much overt influence, and Hu will have effectively repudiated what has been a prerogative of every Party leader, ever. The second is whether Li Keqiang will be made a vice-chairman of the CMC. This would augment his powers as premier and economic chief, and would indicate that Hu scored a point against Jiang by putting his main man in a crucial post.

A final point is whether Li Yuanchao and Wang Yang will end up on the Politburo Standing Committee. Again, both are broadly aligned with Hu Jintao, and their placement on the most powerful political organ in China will indicate how much Hu will retain at least proxy influence over the next decade or so.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

7:15 p.m. EST Wednesday — How to Rig Press Conferences at the Congress

Did you read the ABC PM radio interview

China uses mysterious Australian to rig Congress coverage?

PM radio’s Mark Colvin said,

“More than 2,200 delegates took part in a series of rubber-stamp votes that were always guaranteed to pass. In fact, there’s been much about this Congress that could fairly be described as really just a piece of theatre, including the role of a mysterious ‘journalist’ from Australia who’s been thrust into the limelight.”

Stephen McDonnell interviewed the “journalist” Andrea Yu,

STEPHEN MCDONNELL: Because they know they’re going to get an easy question from you, though, don’t they?

ANDREA YU: I think that’s part of it, yes.

STEPHEN MCDONNELL: So in the long run, do you think that this will be more the way things will happen, that the Chinese government will be having sort of set up companies like yours all over the world to present itself in the way it wants to?

ANDREA YU: It’s a very hard question and I don’t know how long I’ll be doing this for because of that. Yes, that it is a very challenging question. I think certainly spreading Chinese government soft power around the world via avenues like this is very important to the government and …

Read more

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

3:00 p.m. EST Wednesday — Hu Jintao to Totally Step Down

For some time now it has been a matter of debate and speculation as to whether Hu Jintao would retain his seat on the Central Military Commission after handing over the reigns of power in the Party to Xi Jinping. Now the answer is out, according to reports: Hu is “all out” as part of a political bargain to also disentangle Jiang Zemin from the operations of the Party.

The Hong Kong-based Ming Pao reported on Nov. 14 that Zhang Qinsheng, a deputy Chief of Staff of the People’s Liberation Army, confirmed that Hu would not be hanging around on the CMC. (Zhang may have been getting back at Hu because the former was not allowed to enter the CMC, but the same news has come from other sources.)

The Japanese paper Asahi Shimbun has reported a similar conclusion, according to a Nov. 14 article. “According to a number of Chinese Communist Party personnel, at an internal high-level Party meeting on Nov. 11, it was decided that Hu Jintao would ‘completely quit.’”

At the same meeting, it was also decided that Jiang Zemin would have his office removed from Zhongnanhai, the Party’s leadership compound. The idea behind Hu’s move, according to Asahi Shimbun, was that by withdrawing entirely from Chinese politics, he would also be forcing Jiang to do the same.

But two former officials had tried that: Qiao Shi and Li Ruihuan. Jiang, as we all know, kept at it, even after that withdrew in an attempt to have Jiang do the same. Zhang Tianliang, a Washington-DC based political commentator, said in an interview: “If Hu Jintao really does entirely quit, in an effort to prevent Jiang from meddling, then he’ll be like Qiao Shi and Li Ruihuan back then: falling into Jiang’s trap.”

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

2:30 p.m. EST Wednesday — Assorted Remarks

Dissident Hu Jia isn’t pleased with the 18th Party Congress, to the extent that he hopes the regime won’t be around for a 19th. 

In a recent open letter, he writes: “The Chinese Communist Party is not a ruling Party. … It is hardly a political party in the modern sense, but a huge group of vested interests overseeing a powerful nationwide mafia class. It plunders and possesses the wealth created by the people. It is greedy, and it is violent.”

He goes on, that: “The core Chinese domestic and international issues are all because the Communist Party rejects universal values ​​and violates civil rights, for the interests of itself. I hope that the 18th Party Congress is the last session of the Congress, and there’ll be no 19th Party Congress.”





GET THE FREE DAILY E-NEWSLETTER


Selected Topics from The Epoch Times

Sequestration