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Happy to Learn About One’s Own Shortcomings

Origin of the idiom 聞過則喜


Epoch Times Staff
Created: January 26, 2013 Last Updated: February 6, 2013
Related articles: China » Culture
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Businessmen have an informal discussion by the window at the office. Being open to accepting criticism and constructive advice can help one solve problems and make changes to continually improve affairs and relationships at work and in everyday life. (imtmphoto/Photos.com)

Businessmen have an informal discussion by the window at the office. Being open to accepting criticism and constructive advice can help one solve problems and make changes to continually improve affairs and relationships at work and in everyday life. (imtmphoto/Photos.com)

“Being happy to have one’s shortcomings pointed out” (聞過則喜, pronounced wén guò zé xǐ) is a Chinese idiom that originated from Meng Zi (孟子), also known as Mencius, the most well-known successor of Confucian doctrine.

The idiom refers to being glad to hear criticism and being open to accepting new ideas.

Meng Zi once praised Zi Lu, a student of Confucius, stating: “When someone directly points out a mistake that Zi Lu has made, Zi Lu is happy.”

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