Subscribe

High Expectations for Asia Week New York 2013

Beauty will rule the senses in a week of sacred and scholarly Asian art

By Denise Darcel
Epoch Times Staff
Created: October 22, 2012 Last Updated: January 8, 2013
Print E-mail to a friend Give feedback

“Uwakimono: The Fancy-Free Type (someone who is restless, likes to pose and floats on air),” from the series “Kyokun oya no mekagami; A Parent’s Moralizing Spectacles,” circa 1802, by Kitagawa Utamaro (1754–1806). (Courtesy of Joan B. Mirviss Ltd.)

“Uwakimono: The Fancy-Free Type (someone who is restless, likes to pose and floats on air),” from the series “Kyokun oya no mekagami; A Parent’s Moralizing Spectacles,” circa 1802, by Kitagawa Utamaro (1754–1806). (Courtesy of Joan B. Mirviss Ltd.)

Plans for the Asian art event of the world have been announced. The efflorescence of Asia Week New York is worth the wait for returning art enthusiasts, seasoned collectors, and the city’s art lovers. 

An astounding collaboration of international Asian art specialists, major auction houses, museums, and Asian cultural institutions showcasing and selling traditional Asian art will take place simultaneously throughout metropolitan New York from March 15–23.

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum was chosen as the venue for the invitation-only reception to kick off the week.

“We are especially delighted that the Guggenheim Museum reception will set the stage for the exciting week of activities,” said Henry Howard-Sneyd, chairman of Asia Week New York and Sotheby’s vice-chairman of Asian Art and the Americas.

A ceramic vessel with a blue-enamel glazed banding by the late Japanese potter Shoji Kamoda (1933–1983). (Courtesy of Joan B. Mirviss Ltd.)

A ceramic vessel with a blue-enamel glazed banding by the late Japanese potter Shoji Kamoda (1933–1983). (Courtesy of Joan B. Mirviss Ltd.)

The event continues Asia Week’s tradition of shining a spotlight on a different cultural landmark each year. Last year, the opening-night reception was held at the Morgan Library and Museum and featured rarely seen Asian manuscripts and works of art from its collection. In prior years, receptions were held at the Rubin Museum and the Asia Society.

“The selection of these diverse cultural institutions reinforces just how important the Asian art field has become to New York’s art scene,” Howard-Sneyd said in a press release.

Established by Sotheby’s in the 1990s, Asia Week subsequently lost steam, only to be reestablished about five years ago and has been gaining traction as the leading Asian art event in the world since.

Last March, at Asia Week and Asia Week New York, art lovers spent a staggering $170 million on art. Auction houses experienced a spike in interest and spending, with a total of $140 million in purchases. 

“As we head into our fifth year, it is extremely gratifying to see how important Asia Week New York has become for so many international collectors, curators, scholars, and Asian art enthusiasts,” Howard-Sneyd said.

Participants in the upcoming Asia Week have set aside exceptional and extraordinary pieces they plan to debut at the event. We can expect an array of treasures bought in by dealers from England, France, Italy, Japan, Thailand, and the United States.  

But Asia Week is not only for collectors and dealers; it’s also a cultural treasure for New Yorkers to enjoy. Visitors can navigate the week’s myriad activities with the comprehensive guide and maps available at the galleries, auction houses, and cultural institutions, starting February 2013, and online at www.AsiaWeekNewYork.com.

The Epoch Times publishes in 35 countries and in 19 languages. Subscribe to our e-newsletter.




   

GET THE FREE DAILY E-NEWSLETTER


Selected Topics from The Epoch Times

Daniel Craig, Contributor